Editorial guidelines

Preparing the submission

Each submission for Facta Ficta: Journal of Theory, Narrative & Media should containt two documents, one with the manuscript, and one with the personal information.

Both documents should be saved as .doc or (preferably) .docx and do avoid saving in .rtf, .odt. or .pdf or other formats.

The document with the manuscript should be entitled following the pattern: “Name, surname, Title of the article“, whilst the document with personal information, listed below, should be entitled as “Name, surname – Abstract and bionote”

Please ensure that your manuscript is kept free from any information indicating the authorship or affiliation of the contributor. Before sending the document, clear its metadata, and double check the document for any easily discernible identifications of authorship such as a first person pronoun used next to the title of the contributors’s publication.

Personal information cleared from the manuscript and saved in a separate document must include:

1. Contributors name, surname, and current affiliation;

2. E-mail and postal addresses;

3. Biographical note (no shorter than 50 and no longer than 80 words) covering basic academic information along with research interests and a selection of (up to three) most important or recent publications.

4a. Abstract in English in case of international submissiosn (no shorter than 250 and no longer than 350 words).
4b. Abstract in Polish and in English in case of Polish submissions (no shorter than 250 and no longer than 350 words).

5a. A list of up to 10 keywords in English in case of international submissions.
5b. A list of up to 10 keywords in Polish and in English in case of Polish submissions.

Spelling

Facta Ficta Research Centre’s publications support British-English spelling. For your convenience, please set your text editor to English (U.K.) spelling (note however that we use -ed instead of -lt: spelled instead of spelt; learned instead of learnt).

Formatting

As the submitted text will undergo a review and additional editing process, please use default settings in your text editor. 

Fonts, alingment, and spacing

Text body:

Times New Roman, 12 points, 1,5 line spacing, left-aligned

Blockquotes and footnotes: 

Times New Roman, 10 points, 1,15 line spacing, left-aligned

Basic formatting

For  e m p h a s e s use bold typeface.

Italics may be only to identify a title of any kind of work (book, article, movie, TV series, video game, song, comic book etc.). Do not italicise longer quotations from Latin or any other foreign language

The use of boldface, all caps, small caps, or any type of decorative formatting (such as colors or massive font sizes) is strongly discouraged.

Hyphens and dashes

Differ use hyphens (-), to join words (ex. world-building) or to separate syllables within them (e-learning). Please do not use hyphens instead of dashes ( – ) which should be used without spacing as a replacement for commas or parentheses in gramatically or rhetorically justified situations.

Word-wrapping

If you are using automatic word-wrapping, please disable the feature and do not wrap words on your own.

Hyperlinks and digital sources

Since Facta Ficta Journal is published digitally, implementation of links or internal hyperlinks in the text is encouraged. However, they need to be marked in a distinguishing way (for instance blue as in the MS Word standard) so as to facilitate the final editing process.

Narrating

When writing an article for Facta Ficta Journal, please avoid the use of the first person narration in favour of the third person one (e.g. it is observed rather than I observeit will be argued rather than I will argue etc.).

Quoting

Please use double quotes (“ ”) to mark any kind of in-text quotation shorter than 40 words (or 3 lines). In case you need to quote a phrase within a quote, please use guillemets pointing inwards (» «), for example:

“The idea that old media feel more »natural« and less mediated the new forms is connected to familiarity and conventions” (Jörgensen 2013: 8).

Note: indirect quotations are not the same thing as quoting a certain work after another. This practice is strongly discouraged and we do advise contributors to quote from original sources only.

When quoting a certain source indirectly, please provide a reference without indicating the page number, for example:

Kristen Jörgensen have argued that old media only feel more “natural” as they are already familiar to the addressees of a certain artistic work (Jörgensen 2013).

For in-text quotations longer than 40 words (or 3 lines) please use a preformatted blockquote:

Paragraph spacing before the blockquote: 10 points
Line spacing in the blockquote: 1,15
Paragraph spacing after the blockquote: 10 points

Important: please set the spacing in parahraph properties and do not use enters as they may not be preserved in the final layout.

Please do not use quotation marks at both ends of the blockquote. If an in-text quotation is needed within the blockquote, please proceed as if it were a direct quotation in the main body of the document.

Translating

All quotations translated by the contributor have to be accompanied by their original version:

1. in square brackets for in-text quotations shorter than 40 words (a word count applies in such instance only to a translated version, not to the original quotation in the brackets)

2. in footnotes with annotation: “Translated by the author from:” and placed within a double quotation mark.

Referencing

Facta Ficta Journal supports modified Harvard citation style explained in the section below. All quotations have to be parenthetical and simplified (i.e. without comments such as ibid., cf., see also etc.) in order to indicate the author, the year of publication, and the page rank of the quoted source. Footnotes should be kept as clean of any references as possible in order to provide additional commentary to the main body of the manuscript.

Illustrations

All images should be supplied in a bitmap image format such as .png, .tiff, .jpeg or .wmf (Windows Metafile for vector images embeddable in Word documents). When saving  bitmaps, please make sure that the compression option is selected to avoid large file sizes.

Please do not embed any images in Word documents as they will be downgraded to 96DPI. Images should be sent in 150 or, at best, 300DPI and in the largest resulution available.

If illustrations are not the copyrighted property of the contributor, a signed statement allowing for the transfer of copyrights for publication in CC BY 4.0. will be needed. If so, please contact the Editors to obtain a pattern for the copyright transfer agreement.

Tables, diagrams, and illustrations, or any other graphic content have to be provided with captions located below the embedded content (at the very best: used automated numbered captions), following the pattern: Table 1., Table 2., Table 3. for tables and Figure 1., Figure 2., Figure 3. for the rest of the illustrations.

Licencing

Facta Ficta Research Centre supports open access to scholar works wholeheartedly and, therefore, releases all of its publication under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). This means that by sending us your article you agree to the terms of the licence and allow your work be distributed in open access and be used by the academic community (i.e. quoted in other publications) if―and only if―an “appropriate credit” is given by whoever quotes the text to the author themselves. This also means that you will be free to republish your work elsewhere providing you credit Facta Ficta Journal in the first footnote for publishing it on beforehand. Full legalcode of CC BY 4.0 licence is available: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode

References

Facta Ficta Journal uses modified Harvard referencing system with a strong emphasis on parenthetical in-text quotations and references-free end footnotes. The aim of those guidelines is to provide cohesive references not only for literary, but also multimedia resources―so should you spot any inconsistencies or would like to contribute in any way to improve the guidelines, please contact the Editors.

The following exemplification will juxtapose in-text references and bibliographical entries using color-coding for Author’s convenience (please do not duplicate it in your manuscripts) to mark the sources referred in the body of the submitted text.

Author/multiple authors

The critique of logocentrism, widely discussed by Derrida (1976, 1981)…

Derrida Jacques (1976), Of Grammatology, transl. by Gayatri Chakravorty Spi­vak, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Derrida Jacques (1981), Dissemination, transl. by Barbara Johnson, Chicago: Chicago University Press.

Many theorist of intertextuality (Kristeva 1980, Gennette 1997, Allen 2000)…

Kristeva Julia (1980), Desire in Language: A Semiotic Approach to Literature and Art, New York: Columbia University Press.
Genette Gerard (1997), Palimpsests. Literature in the Second Degree, transl. by Channa Newman, Cloude Doubinsky, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
Graham Allen (2000), Intertextuality, New York, London: Routledge (New Critical Idiom).

Book

As one may read in The Role of the Reader (Eco 2012: 154)

Eco Umberto (2012), The Role of the Reader: Explorations in the Semiotics of Texts, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Book chapter

This quotation from Johen Venus’s Simulations of Self-Action (2010: 196, 198-199) clearly shows that…

Venus Jochen (2010), ‘Simulation of Self-Action. On the Morphology of Remote-Controlled Role Playing’, in: Stephan Günzel, Michael Liebe, Dieter Mersch (eds.), Logic and Structure of the Computer Game, Potsdam: Potsdam University Press, pp. 196-207

Journal article

e.g. (Suvin 1972: 373)

Suvin Darko (1972), ‘On the Poetics of Science Fiction Genre’, College English: 3 (34), pp. 372-382.

e.g. (Wesp 2014: par.7)

Wesp Edward (2014), ‘A Too-Coherent World: Game Studies and the Myth of “Narrative” Media’, Game Studies: 2 (14), online: http://gamestudies.org/1402/articles/wesp, par.1-27 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Authored web content

e.g. (Jenkins 2014)

Jenkins Henry (2014), ‘Why Do We Need to “Understand” Fans?’, Confessions of an Aca-Fan, online: http://henryjenkins.org/2014/03/why-do-we-need-to-understand-fans-a-conversation-with-mark-duffett-part-four.html [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Barker Sammy (2015), ‘Sony Admits PS4 Exclusive Until Dawn Was a Sleeper Hit’, PushSquare.com, online: http://www.pushsquare.com/news/2015/10/sony_admits_ps4_exclusive_until_dawn_was_a_sleeper_hit, [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Anderson Hephzibah (2016), ‘Neverheard of Fomo? You’re so missing out’, online: TheGuardian.com, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/apr/17/hephzibah-anderson-fomo-new-acronym [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Multi-authored web content (portals, news sites, social media, etc.)

e.g. (BBC.com 2013a, 2013b)

BBC.com (2013a), ‘Should the rules of war be included in computer games?’ online: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-24318061 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

BBC.com (2013b) ‘Red Cross marks 150th anniversary’, online: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-21489098 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

e.g. (Twitter.com 2015)

Twitter.com (2015), https://twitter.com/Facta_Ficta/status/580681149749600256 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Important: When quoting content posted via social media, please use permalinks. Instructions for Facebook and Twitter can be found, respectively, at https://www.facebook.com/help/community/question/?id=282662498552845 and https://support.twitter.com/articles/80586#

Web video

e.g. (Facta Ficta 2016: 2:45-3:00)

Facta Ficta (2016), ‘Marie-Laure Ryan, On the Worldness of Narrative Representation’, Youtube.com, online: http://youtu.be/zqFsg8zqcLA, 0:59:49 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Referencing order: Youtube user, publishing year, time interval

Please treat the length of the quoted part of a video as an equivalent of pagination (i. e. quote full videos only under exactly the same circumstances as when referring to the whole book).

Encyclopaedia and online encyclopaedia

e.g. (Herman 2008: 570)

Herman David (2008), ‘Storyworld’, in: David Herman, Manfred Jahn, Marie-Laure Ryan (eds.) Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory, London, New York: Routledge 2008.

e.g. (Alber, Fludernik 2014: par.3)

Alber Jan, Monika Fludernik (2014), ‘Mediacy and Narrative Mediation’, online: Peter Hühn et al. (eds.) Living Handbook of Narratology, online: http://www.lhn.uni-hamburg.de/article/mediacy-and-narrative-mediation, par.1-27 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Important: please note that dictionaries, contrary to encyclopaedias, are not cosidered a scientific source and should not be referenced in works cited section.

Novel and short story

e.g. (Crowley 2000: 154)

Crowley John (2000), Beasts, London: Victor Gollancz.

e.g. for single short story (Sanderson 2015: 312)

e.g. for the whole anthology (Martin and Dozois 2015)

Sanderson Brandon (2015), ‘Shadows for the Silence in the Forest of Hell’, in: George R. R. Martin, Gardner Dozois (eds.), Dangerous Women, New York: Tor, pp. 297-346.

Film

e. g. (Wright 2010)

Wright Edgar, dir. (2010), Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, Universal Pictures.

TV / animated series

e. g. (Smith 2010) or (ABC 2010)

Smith Adam, dir. (2010), ‘The Eleventh Hour’, in: Doctor Who, ABC Television.

Video game

e. g. (Ubisoft Montreal 2014a, Ubisoft Montreal 2014b)

Ubisoft Montreal (2014a), Assassin’s Creed: Unity, Ubisoft [PC].
Ubisoft Montreal (2014b), Watch dogs, Ubisoft [Playstation 4].

Referencing order: In-text: Developer, year. In bibliography: Developer, Title of the game, Publisher. Please do not indicate the platform.

Please use additional descriptions in the main text so as to enable locating the analysed moment in gameplay. A good way of bypassing video game’s referencing problems is to link the recorded (for instance on YouTube or equivalent platform) playthrough  (best solution: so called game movie with no commentary voiced over) and find the desirable location or a part of the storyline.

e.g. (Gamematics 2014: 2:38-2:58)

Gamematics (2014), ‘Bioshock: Infinite game movie’, YouTube.com,  online: https://youtu.be/m_l2wUiC5gg, 3:18:06 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Comic book

e.g. (Fox, Sekowsky and Sachs 1961)

Fox Gardner F., Mike Sekowsky, Bernard Sachs (1961), The Wheel of Misfortune, in: “Justice League of America”, vol. 6, National Comics Publications [DC Comics].

For more tips regarding comic book citations see: Allen Ellis (1998), Citing Comics in Scholarly Writing, online:  https://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/~wilkins/writing/Handouts/comics-cite.html#e14 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

e. g. (Mozart 2015)

Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus (2015), ‘Symphony no. 38 in D major’, in: Mozart: The Symphonies, Vienna Philharmonic: Deutsche Grammophon [CD].

Referencing order: Composer or songwriter if known, (Year of the release), Titlte of the work or piece, Performers: and Publisher or Recording Company.

If possible, please do provide hyperlinks to legally available samples or whole recordings of the analysed pieces (for instance Naxos Music Library).

Art, images, maps

e.g. (Magritte 1953)

Magritte René (1953), Golconda [oil on canvas], Houston: The Menil Collection.

e.g. (Elreviae 2014)

Des Touches Maxime (Elreviae) (2014), The Refuge [digital paiting], Deviantart.com, online: http://elreviae.deviantart.com/art/The-Refuge-485574786 [accessed: 30.08.2015].

e.g. (Tolkien c. 1930: 410)

Tolkien John Ronald Reuel (c. 1930), ‘The Map of Beleriand’, in: John R. R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien, The Lost Road and Other Writings (The History of Middle-Earth, vol. V), Boston 1987, p. 410 (illustration).

Works cited section (example)

To achieve a maximum level of consistency and help you adapt to our editing guidelines, we have built this bibliography upon all already cited works in examples. We have kept colour marking so as to facilitate references between cited works section and aforementioned examples.

Important: Please be reminded that cited works section can only aggregate citation and references made in the main text. All works added to this section and yet neither quoted, nor referred to in the main text, will be deleted by editors.

Alber Jan, Fludernik Monika (2014), ‘Mediacy and Narrative Mediation’, online: Peter Hühn et al. (eds.), Living Handbook of Narratology, online: http://www.lhn.uni-hamburg.de/article/mediacy-and-narrative-mediation, par.1-27 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

BBC.com (2013a), ‘Should the rules of war be included in computer games?’ online: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-24318061 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

BBC.com (2013b) ‘Red Cross marks 150th anniversary’, online: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-21489098 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Crowley John (2000), Beasts, London: Victor Gollancz.

Derrida Jacques (1976), Of Grammatology, transl. by Gayatri Chakravorty Spi­vak, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Derrida Jacques (1981), Dissemination, transl. by Barbara Johnson, Chicago: Chicago University Press.

Des Touches Maxime (Elreviae) (2014), The Refuge [digital paiting], DeviantArt.com, online: http://elreviae.deviantart.com/art/The-Refuge-485574786 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Eco Umberto (2012), The Role of the Reader: Explorations in the Semiotics of Texts, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Facta Ficta (2016), ‘Marie-Laure Ryan, On the Worldness of Narrative Representation’, YouTube.com, online: http://youtu.be/zqFsg8zqcLA, 0:59:49 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Fox Gardner F., Sekowsky Mike, Sachs Bernard (1961), The Wheel of Misfortune, in: “Justice League of America”, vol. 6, National Comics Publications [DC Comics].

Gamematics (2014), ‘Bioshock: Infinite game movie’, YouTube.com, online: https://youtu.be/m_l2wUiC5gg, 3:18:06 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Genette Gerard (1997), Palimpsests. Literature in the Second Degree, transl. by Channa Newman, Cloude Doubinsky, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Graham Allen (2000), Intertextuality, New York, London: Routledge (New Critical Idiom).

Jenkins Henry (2014), ‘Why Do We Need to “Understand” Fans?’, in: Confessions of an Aca-Fan, online: http://henryjenkins.org/2014/03/why-do-we-need-to-understand-fans-a-conversation-with-mark-duffett-part-four.html [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Kristeva Julia (1980), Desire in Language: A Semiotic Approach to Literature and Art, New York: Columbia University Press.

Magritte René (1953), Golconda [oil on canvas], Houston: The Menil Collection.

Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus (2015), ‘Symphony no. 38 in D major’, in: Mozart: The Symphonies, Vienna Philharmonic: Deutsche Grammophon [CD].

Sanderson Brandon (2015), ‘Shadows for the Silence in the Forest of Hell’, in: George R. R. Martin, Gardner Dozois (eds.), Dangerous Women, New York: Tor, pp. 297-346.

George R. R. Martin, Gardner Dozois, eds. (2015), Dangerous Women, New York: Tor.

Smith Adam, dir. (2010), ‘The Eleventh Hour’, in: Doctor Who, ABC Television.

Suvin Darko (1972), ‘On the Poetics of Science Fiction Genre’, College English: 3 (34), pp. 372-382.

Tolkien John Ronald Reuel (c. 1930), ‘The Map of Beleriand’, in: John R. R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien, The Lost Road and Other Writings (The History of Middle-Earth, vol. V), Boston 1987.

Twitter.com (2015), https://twitter.com/Facta_Ficta/status/580681149749600256  [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Ubisoft Montreal (2014a), Assassin’s Creed: Unity, Ubisoft [PC].

Ubisoft Montreal (2014b), Watch dogs, Ubisoft [PlayStation 4].

Venus Jochen (2010), ‘Simulation of Self-Action. On the Morphology of Remote-Controlled Role Playing’, in: Stephan Günzel, Michael Liebe, Dieter Mersch (eds.), Logic and Structure of the Computer Game, Potsdam: Potsdam University Press, pp. 196-207.

Wesp Edward (2014), ‘A Too-Coherent World: Game Studies and the Myth of “Narrative” Media’, Game Studies: 2 (14), online: http://gamestudies.org/1402/articles/wesp, par.1-27 [accessed: 1.10.2016].

Wright Edgar, dir. (2010), Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, Universal Pictures [BlueRay].

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